Publish or perish? The curse of the researcher

pirate

The idea of this post is to think about the need and urgency to publish in journals for an academic. To begin with, publishing regularly in good journals (peer-reviewed journals, covered in relevant indexes) is vital to upgrade your career as an academic.

This thing of publishing is a pimple I found when I finished my doctoral dissertation and started to take an interest in lecturing and academic career. I believed that to be smart and handsome (so to speak), to have a PhD and an MBA would be enough to get you hired at any university or business school. But it does not.

So there are two types of complementary reasons to publish in journals:

Reasons first class, politically correct, which editors love:

  • to improve the world and the science, producing solutions for our human problems.
  • because you are passionate about your research and you want to broadcast it.
  • as a reward in itself and a certification that your research activity is good enough.

Pragmatic reasons for pirates of the Caribbean, and survivors of the academic jungle:

  • to improve your curriculum and stand out.
  • to find a tenure position, or just a professor job.
  • to meet the requirements of the tenure, and not be fired.
  • to raise funds for your future research.

But, what are your objectives for publishing? Do you meet the rules? Or publishing is above anything else? Even jeopardizing your reputation in the publishing industry?

Research is fine, you learn, meet people and have fun (rich man), but many times the process of publishing is the other side of the coin (poor man). Gaudeamus helps you to improve the process of publishing in journals.

Advertisements

19 Responses to Publish or perish? The curse of the researcher

  1. sarah says:

    I’m curious to know why an MBA who wants an academic career would expect to be exempt from the need to publish in peer-reviewed media.

    • Sorry, but I did not mean that, because all professors have/need to publish. For the academic career, PhD is more relevant than a MBA, except if you focus just on part time lecturing in business schools.

  2. drroopesh says:

    Kudos on sharing what you know. Such a blog is sorely needed, and will go a long way in relieving “publicationphobia”. I, too, have embarked on a similar journey recently: demystifying community medicine (communitymedicine4asses.wordpress.com); and share your sentiments. Good job! Keep it up!.

  3. Pingback: Start your love story with journals « How to publish in journals

  4. Pingback: Journals indexing: A Space Odyssey? « How to publish in journals

  5. Pingback: Journals that ask for money. Is it so dishonest? « How to publish in journals

  6. Pingback: Journals that ask for money: poll conclusions « How to publish in journals

  7. Pingback: Impact factor (II). Better publications? | How to publish in journals

  8. Pingback: How to increase the probabilities of your papers to be cited? | How to publish in journals

  9. Pingback: Worst practices for misconduct authors | How to publish in journals

  10. Pingback: Tomorrow belongs to cites | How to publish in journals

  11. Pingback: Gaudeamus: 1.000 profs and editors building a better academic world | How to publish in journals

  12. Pingback: POLL: The current use of open access journals | How to publish in journals

  13. Pingback: Book review: ‘How to get research published in journals’ | How to publish in journals

  14. Pingback: The future of scientific research dissemination: Liberalism back again | How to publish in journals

  15. Pingback: I’m not stupid when publishing in journals | How to publish in journals

  16. Pingback: Publishing research in non-indexed journals | How to publish in journals

  17. Pingback: Journal Citation Reports: Sources of its power in scholarly publishing | How to publish in journals

  18. Pingback: Academic networks contest: ResearchGate vs. Academia vs. Mendeley | How to publish in journals

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: